Windows下Redis的安装及PHP扩展使用

1、下载redis的windows应用程序,支持32位和64位,根据phpinfo()中的信息(下文中有截图)判断下载

下载地址(可能需要翻墙): https://github.com/dmajkic/redis/downloads

2、将相应的程序copy到你所需要的目录中,在这里我使用的64位,放到E:\redis目录

3、启动redis服务端:打开一个cmd窗口,先切换到redis所放目录(E:\redis),运行 redis-server.exe redis.conf 

注意redis.conf为配置文件,主要配置了redis所使用的端口等信息(如果不写则默认redis.conf)

有的下载的redis压缩包里没有redis.conf,我把默认的redis.conf的文件内容放在文章最后。

注意:此窗口为redis服务端运行窗口,关闭后则redis关闭。

4、测试是否ok,启动redis客户端:另开一个cmd窗口,进入目录之后运行命令redis-cli.exe -h 127.0.0.1 -p 6379,然后就可以进行操作了

5、下载redis的php扩展:

5.1.使用phpinfo()查看当前版本的信息

Windows下Redis的安装及PHP扩展使用

5.2.根据PHP版本号,编译器版本号和CPU架构

选择php_redis-2.2.5-5.6-nts-vc11-x64.zip和php_igbinary-1.2.1-5.5-nts-vc11-x64.zip

下载地址:

http://windows.php.net/downloads/pecl/snaps/redis/2.2.5/

http://windows.php.net/downloads/pecl/releases/igbinary/1.2.1/

Windows下Redis的安装及PHP扩展使用

Windows下Redis的安装及PHP扩展使用

5.3.解压缩后,将php_redis.dll和php_igbinary.dll拷贝至php的ext目录下

Windows下Redis的安装及PHP扩展使用

5.4.修改php.ini,在该文件中加入:

extension=php_igbinary.dll

extension=php_redis.dll

注意:extension=php_igbinary.dll一定要放在extension=php_redis.dll的前面,否则此扩展不会生效

5.5.重启Apache或者Nginx后,使用phpinfo查看扩展是否成功安装

Windows下Redis的安装及PHP扩展使用

偷了一张图  主要看待修改的php.ini位置

Windows下Redis的安装及PHP扩展使用

注意:

WAMP下安装redis,除了在此处F:\wamp\bin\php\php5.4.16\ext加入两个dll文件,在F:\wamp\bin\php\php5.4.16下的php.ini加入配置外,apache下的F:\wamp\bin\apache\Apache2.4.4\bin 里面的php.ini也要加入配置,否则配置失败(会出现redis not found)

6、重启web服务器

7、php测试

<?php
    $redis = new Redis();
    $redis->connect('127.0.0.1',6379);
    $redis->set('test','hello redis'); echo $redis->get('test'); ?>

8、附:默认redis.conf文件内容

# Redis configuration file example # Note on units: when memory size is needed, it is possible to specifiy # it in the usual form of 1k 5GB 4M and so forth: # # 1k => 1000 bytes # 1kb => 1024 bytes # 1m => 1000000 bytes # 1mb => 1024*1024 bytes # 1g => 1000000000 bytes # 1gb => 1024*1024*1024 bytes # # units are case insensitive so 1GB 1Gb 1gB are all the same. # By default Redis does not run as a daemon. Use 'yes' if you need it. # Note that Redis will write a pid file in /var/run/redis.pid when daemonized. daemonize no # When running daemonized, Redis writes a pid file in /var/run/redis.pid by # default. You can specify a custom pid file location here.
pidfile /var/run/redis.pid # Accept connections on the specified port, default is 6379. # If port 0 is specified Redis will not listen on a TCP socket.
port 6379 # If you want you can bind a single interface, if the bind option is not # specified all the interfaces will listen for incoming connections. # # bind 127.0.0.1 # Specify the path for the unix socket that will be used to listen for # incoming connections. There is no default, so Redis will not listen # on a unix socket when not specified. # # unixsocket /tmp/redis.sock # unixsocketperm 755 # Close the connection after a client is idle for N seconds (0 to disable)
timeout 0 # Set server verbosity to 'debug' # it can be one of: # debug (a lot of information, useful for development/testing) # verbose (many rarely useful info, but not a mess like the debug level) # notice (moderately verbose, what you want in production probably) # warning (only very important / critical messages are logged)
loglevel verbose # Specify the log file name. Also 'stdout' can be used to force # Redis to log on the standard output. Note that if you use standard # output for logging but daemonize, logs will be sent to /dev/null
logfile stdout # To enable logging to the system logger, just set 'syslog-enabled' to yes, # and optionally update the other syslog parameters to suit your needs. # syslog-enabled no # Specify the syslog identity. # syslog-ident redis # Specify the syslog facility.  Must be USER or between LOCAL0-LOCAL7. # syslog-facility local0 # Set the number of databases. The default database is DB 0, you can select # a different one on a per-connection basis using SELECT <dbid> where # dbid is a number between 0 and 'databases'-1
databases 16 ################################ SNAPSHOTTING  ################################# # # Save the DB on disk: # #   save <seconds> <changes> # #   Will save the DB if both the given number of seconds and the given #   number of write operations against the DB occurred. # #   In the example below the behaviour will be to save: #   after 900 sec (15 min) if at least 1 key changed #   after 300 sec (5 min) if at least 10 keys changed #   after 60 sec if at least 10000 keys changed # #   Note: you can disable saving at all commenting all the "save" lines.
save 900 1
save 300 10
save 60 10000 # Compress string objects using LZF when dump .rdb databases? # For default that's set to 'yes' as it's almost always a win. # If you want to save some CPU in the saving child set it to 'no' but # the dataset will likely be bigger if you have compressible values or keys.
rdbcompression yes # The filename where to dump the DB
dbfilename dump.rdb # The working directory. # # The DB will be written inside this directory, with the filename specified # above using the 'dbfilename' configuration directive. # # Also the Append Only File will be created inside this directory. # # Note that you must specify a directory here, not a file name.
dir ./ ################################# REPLICATION ################################# # Master-Slave replication. Use slaveof to make a Redis instance a copy of # another Redis server. Note that the configuration is local to the slave # so for example it is possible to configure the slave to save the DB with a # different interval, or to listen to another port, and so on. # # slaveof <masterip> <masterport> # If the master is password protected (using the "requirepass" configuration # directive below) it is possible to tell the slave to authenticate before # starting the replication synchronization process, otherwise the master will # refuse the slave request. # # masterauth <master-password> # When a slave lost the connection with the master, or when the replication # is still in progress, the slave can act in two different ways: # # 1) if slave-serve-stale-data is set to 'yes' (the default) the slave will #    still reply to client requests, possibly with out of data data, or the #    data set may just be empty if this is the first synchronization. # # 2) if slave-serve-stale data is set to 'no' the slave will reply with #    an error "SYNC with master in progress" to all the kind of commands #    but to INFO and SLAVEOF. #
slave-serve-stale-data yes # Slaves send PINGs to server in a predefined interval. It's possible to change # this interval with the repl_ping_slave_period option. The default value is 10 # seconds. # # repl-ping-slave-period 10 # The following option sets a timeout for both Bulk transfer I/O timeout and # master data or ping response timeout. The default value is 60 seconds. # # It is important to make sure that this value is greater than the value # specified for repl-ping-slave-period otherwise a timeout will be detected # every time there is low traffic between the master and the slave. # # repl-timeout 60 ################################## SECURITY ################################### # Require clients to issue AUTH <PASSWORD> before processing any other # commands.  This might be useful in environments in which you do not trust # others with access to the host running redis-server. # # This should stay commented out for backward compatibility and because most # people do not need auth (e.g. they run their own servers). # # Warning: since Redis is pretty fast an outside user can try up to # 150k passwords per second against a good box. This means that you should # use a very strong password otherwise it will be very easy to break. # # requirepass foobared # Command renaming. # # It is possilbe to change the name of dangerous commands in a shared # environment. For instance the CONFIG command may be renamed into something # of hard to guess so that it will be still available for internal-use # tools but not available for general clients. # # Example: # # rename-command CONFIG b840fc02d524045429941cc15f59e41cb7be6c52 # # It is also possilbe to completely kill a command renaming it into # an empty string: # # rename-command CONFIG "" ################################### LIMITS #################################### # Set the max number of connected clients at the same time. By default there # is no limit, and it's up to the number of file descriptors the Redis process # is able to open. The special value '0' means no limits. # Once the limit is reached Redis will close all the new connections sending # an error 'max number of clients reached'. # # maxclients 128 # Don't use more memory than the specified amount of bytes. # When the memory limit is reached Redis will try to remove keys with an # EXPIRE set. It will try to start freeing keys that are going to expire # in little time and preserve keys with a longer time to live. # Redis will also try to remove objects from free lists if possible. # # If all this fails, Redis will start to reply with errors to commands # that will use more memory, like SET, LPUSH, and so on, and will continue # to reply to most read-only commands like GET. # # WARNING: maxmemory can be a good idea mainly if you want to use Redis as a # 'state' server or cache, not as a real DB. When Redis is used as a real # database the memory usage will grow over the weeks, it will be obvious if # it is going to use too much memory in the long run, and you'll have the time # to upgrade. With maxmemory after the limit is reached you'll start to get # errors for write operations, and this may even lead to DB inconsistency. # # maxmemory <bytes> # MAXMEMORY POLICY: how Redis will select what to remove when maxmemory # is reached? You can select among five behavior: # # volatile-lru -> remove the key with an expire set using an LRU algorithm # allkeys-lru -> remove any key accordingly to the LRU algorithm # volatile-random -> remove a random key with an expire set # allkeys->random -> remove a random key, any key # volatile-ttl -> remove the key with the nearest expire time (minor TTL) # noeviction -> don't expire at all, just return an error on write operations # # Note: with all the kind of policies, Redis will return an error on write #       operations, when there are not suitable keys for eviction. # #       At the date of writing this commands are: set setnx setex append #       incr decr rpush lpush rpushx lpushx linsert lset rpoplpush sadd #       sinter sinterstore sunion sunionstore sdiff sdiffstore zadd zincrby #       zunionstore zinterstore hset hsetnx hmset hincrby incrby decrby
#       getset mset msetnx exec sort
#
# The default is:
#
# maxmemory-policy volatile-lru
# LRU and minimal TTL algorithms are not precise algorithms but approximated
# algorithms (in order to save memory), so you can select as well the sample
# size to check. For instance for default Redis will check three keys and
# pick the one that was used less recently, you can change the sample size
# using the following configuration directive.
#
# maxmemory-samples 3
############################## APPEND ONLY MODE ###############################
# By default Redis asynchronously dumps the dataset on disk. If you can live
# with the idea that the latest records will be lost if something like a crash
# happens this is the preferred way to run Redis. If instead you care a lot
# about your data and don't want to that a single record can get lost you should
# enable the append only mode: when this mode is enabled Redis will append
# every write operation received in the file appendonly.aof. This file will
# be read on startup in order to rebuild the full dataset in memory.
#
# Note that you can have both the async dumps and the append only file if you
# like (you have to comment the "save" statements above to disable the dumps).
# Still if append only mode is enabled Redis will load the data from the
# log file at startup ignoring the dump.rdb file.
#
# IMPORTANT: Check the BGREWRITEAOF to check how to rewrite the append
# log file in background when it gets too big.
appendonly no
# The name of the append only file (default: "appendonly.aof")
# appendfilename appendonly.aof
# The fsync() call tells the Operating System to actually write data on disk
# instead to wait for more data in the output buffer. Some OS will really flush 
# data on disk, some other OS will just try to do it ASAP.
#
# Redis supports three different modes:
#
# no: don't fsync, just let the OS flush the data when it wants. Faster.
# always: fsync after every write to the append only log . Slow, Safest.
# everysec: fsync only if one second passed since the last fsync. Compromise.
#
# The default is "everysec" that's usually the right compromise between
# speed and data safety. It's up to you to understand if you can relax this to
# "no" that will will let the operating system flush the output buffer when
# it wants, for better performances (but if you can live with the idea of
# some data loss consider the default persistence mode that's snapshotting),
# or on the contrary, use "always" that's very slow but a bit safer than
# everysec.
#
# If unsure, use "everysec".
# appendfsync always
appendfsync everysec
# appendfsync no
# When the AOF fsync policy is set to always or everysec, and a background
# saving process (a background save or AOF log background rewriting) is
# performing a lot of I/O against the disk, in some Linux configurations
# Redis may block too long on the fsync() call. Note that there is no fix for
# this currently, as even performing fsync in a different thread will block
# our synchronous write(2) call.
#
# In order to mitigate this problem it's possible to use the following option
# that will prevent fsync() from being called in the main process while a
# BGSAVE or BGREWRITEAOF is in progress.
#
# This means that while another child is saving the durability of Redis is
# the same as "appendfsync none", that in pratical terms means that it is
# possible to lost up to 30 seconds of log in the worst scenario (with the
# default Linux settings).
# 
# If you have latency problems turn this to "yes". Otherwise leave it as
# "no" that is the safest pick from the point of view of durability.
no-appendfsync-on-rewrite no
# Automatic rewrite of the append only file.
# Redis is able to automatically rewrite the log file implicitly calling
# BGREWRITEAOF when the AOF log size will growth by the specified percentage.
# 
# This is how it works: Redis remembers the size of the AOF file after the
# latest rewrite (or if no rewrite happened since the restart, the size of
# the AOF at startup is used).
#
# This base size is compared to the current size. If the current size is
# bigger than the specified percentage, the rewrite is triggered. Also
# you need to specify a minimal size for the AOF file to be rewritten, this
# is useful to avoid rewriting the AOF file even if the percentage increase
# is reached but it is still pretty small.
#
# Specify a precentage of zero in order to disable the automatic AOF
# rewrite feature.
auto-aof-rewrite-percentage 100
auto-aof-rewrite-min-size 64mb
################################## SLOW LOG ###################################
# The Redis Slow Log is a system to log queries that exceeded a specified
# execution time. The execution time does not include the I/O operations
# like talking with the client, sending the reply and so forth,
# but just the time needed to actually execute the command (this is the only
# stage of command execution where the thread is blocked and can not serve
# other requests in the meantime).
# 
# You can configure the slow log with two parameters: one tells Redis
# what is the execution time, in microseconds, to exceed in order for the
# command to get logged, and the other parameter is the length of the
# slow log. When a new command is logged the oldest one is removed from the
# queue of logged commands.
# The following time is expressed in microseconds, so 1000000 is equivalent
# to one second. Note that a negative number disables the slow log, while
# a value of zero forces the logging of every command.
slowlog-log-slower-than 10000
# There is no limit to this length. Just be aware that it will consume memory.
# You can reclaim memory used by the slow log with SLOWLOG RESET.
slowlog-max-len 1024
################################ VIRTUAL MEMORY ###############################
### WARNING! Virtual Memory is deprecated in Redis 2.4
### The use of Virtual Memory is strongly discouraged.
### WARNING! Virtual Memory is deprecated in Redis 2.4
### The use of Virtual Memory is strongly discouraged.
# Virtual Memory allows Redis to work with datasets bigger than the actual
# amount of RAM needed to hold the whole dataset in memory.
# In order to do so very used keys are taken in memory while the other keys
# are swapped into a swap file, similarly to what operating systems do
# with memory pages.
#
# To enable VM just set 'vm-enabled' to yes, and set the following three
# VM parameters accordingly to your needs.
vm-enabled no
# vm-enabled yes
# This is the path of the Redis swap file. As you can guess, swap files
# can't be shared by different Redis instances, so make sure to use a swap
# file for every redis process you are running. Redis will complain if the
# swap file is already in use.
#
# The best kind of storage for the Redis swap file (that's accessed at random) 
# is a Solid State Disk (SSD).
#
# *** WARNING *** if you are using a shared hosting the default of putting
# the swap file under /tmp is not secure. Create a dir with access granted
# only to Redis user and configure Redis to create the swap file there.
vm-swap-file /tmp/redis.swap
# vm-max-memory configures the VM to use at max the specified amount of
# RAM. Everything that deos not fit will be swapped on disk *if* possible, that
# is, if there is still enough contiguous space in the swap file.
#
# With vm-max-memory 0 the system will swap everything it can. Not a good
# default, just specify the max amount of RAM you can in bytes, but it's
# better to leave some margin. For instance specify an amount of RAM
# that's more or less between 60 and 80% of your free RAM.
vm-max-memory 0
# Redis swap files is split into pages. An object can be saved using multiple
# contiguous pages, but pages can't be shared between different objects.
# So if your page is too big, small objects swapped out on disk will waste
# a lot of space. If you page is too small, there is less space in the swap
# file (assuming you configured the same number of total swap file pages).
#
# If you use a lot of small objects, use a page size of 64 or 32 bytes.
# If you use a lot of big objects, use a bigger page size.
# If unsure, use the default Windows下Redis的安装及PHP扩展使用

vm-page-size 32
# Number of total memory pages in the swap file.
# Given that the page table (a bitmap of free/used pages) is taken in memory,
# every 8 pages on disk will consume 1 byte of RAM.
#
# The total swap size is vm-page-size * vm-pages
#
# With the default of 32-bytes memory pages and 134217728 pages Redis will
# use a 4 GB swap file, that will use 16 MB of RAM for the page table.
#
# It's better to use the smallest acceptable value for your application,
# but the default is large in order to work in most conditions.
vm-pages 134217728
# Max number of VM I/O threads running at the same time.
# This threads are used to read/write data from/to swap file, since they
# also encode and decode objects from disk to memory or the reverse, a bigger
# number of threads can help with big objects even if they can't help with
# I/O itself as the physical device may not be able to couple with many
# reads/writes operations at the same time.
#
# The special value of 0 turn off threaded I/O and enables the blocking
# Virtual Memory implementation.
vm-max-threads 4
############################### ADVANCED CONFIG ###############################
# Hashes are encoded in a special way (much more memory efficient) when they
# have at max a given numer of elements, and the biggest element does not
# exceed a given threshold. You can configure this limits with the following
# configuration directives.
hash-max-zipmap-entries 512
hash-max-zipmap-value 64
# Similarly to hashes, small lists are also encoded in a special way in order
# to save a lot of space. The special representation is only used when
# you are under the following limits:
list-max-ziplist-entries 512
list-max-ziplist-value 64
# Sets have a special encoding in just one case: when a set is composed
# of just strings that happens to be integers in radix 10 in the range
# of 64 bit signed integers.
# The following configuration setting sets the limit in the size of the
# set in order to use this special memory saving encoding.
set-max-intset-entries 512
# Similarly to hashes and lists, sorted sets are also specially encoded in
# order to save a lot of space. This encoding is only used when the length and
# elements of a sorted set are below the following limits:
zset-max-ziplist-entries 128
zset-max-ziplist-value 64
# Active rehashing uses 1 millisecond every 100 milliseconds of CPU time in
# order to help rehashing the main Redis hash table (the one mapping top-level
# keys to values). The hash table implementation redis uses (see dict.c)
# performs a lazy rehashing: the more operation you run into an hash table
# that is rhashing, the more rehashing "steps" are performed, so if the
# server is idle the rehashing is never complete and some more memory is used
# by the hash table.
# 
# The default is to use this millisecond 10 times every second in order to
# active rehashing the main dictionaries, freeing memory when possible.
#
# If unsure:
# use "activerehashing no" if you have hard latency requirements and it is
# not a good thing in your environment that Redis can reply form time to time
# to queries with 2 milliseconds delay.
#
# use "activerehashing yes" if you don't have such hard requirements but
# want to free memory asap when possible.
activerehashing yes
################################## INCLUDES ###################################
# Include one or more other config files here.  This is useful if you
# have a standard template that goes to all redis server but also need
# to customize a few per-server settings.  Include files can include
# other files, so use this wisely.
#
# include /path/to/local.conf
# include /path/to/other.conf 

参考:http://blog.51cto.com/linlin2017/1906329

https://www.cnblogs.com/jasonxiaoqinde/p/6231902.html

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